Seguritan US Immigration Articles

Changing F-1 Student’s Status to H-1B

To change a nonimmigrant status to another, an applicant must be in lawful status not only up to the time that the application is filed but also up to the time when the new status becomes effective. 

In the case of a change to cap subject H-1B for fiscal year 2011 that starts on October 1, 2010, the applicant must have a valid status until that date. If the applicant is out of status, he/she is required to leave the U.S. and apply for H-1B visa at a U.S. consulate abroad. 

The cap refers to the 65,000 annual numerical limitation imposed on initial H-1B visas. In the last several years, the number of H-1B petitions filed exceeded the cap. The latest United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) report shows that so far, 13,500 petitions were received since the start of the filing period on April 1. It is expected that the cap will again be reached before the end of 2011 fiscal year. 

There is a new immigration regulation that automatically allows certain students with a pending or approved H-1B petition to remain in the U.S. during the time when the F-1 status and work authorization would otherwise expire. This regulation provides a way to fill what is referred to as the cap gap so that the students do not have to go abroad to obtain their H-1B visas. 

An example of a cap gap occurs when a student’s optional practical training (OPT) ends in the spring and his/her status expires 60 days after that, leaving a gap of several months before the H-1B status begins on October 1. 

To qualify for the cap gap extension, the H-1B petition must be filed while the student’s authorized duration of status (DS) is still in effect (including any OPT period and the 60 day preparation time known as the grace period.) 

Once the petition is timely filed, the cap gap extension begins and will continue until the adjudication of the petition is completed. To prove continuing status, the student should obtain an updated Form I-20 from his/her designated school official. 

If the H-1B petition is subsequently rejected, denied or revoked, the student will be entitled to the standard 60-day grace period to prepare to depart unless the denial or revocation is based on fraud, misrepresentation or status violation. The grace period begins on the date that the letter of rejection, denial or revocation is postmarked. 

If the H-1B petition is denied or withdrawn, the student may apply for a STEM OPT extension provided that his/her degree is included on the STEM designated degree program list and the application is made within ten (10) days of the denial or withdrawal. STEM refers to degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Students who obtained such degrees are eligible for a 17-month extension in addition to the twelve (12) months initially granted. 

The student who is granted an automatic extension cannot travel outside the U.S. during the cap gap period. If the student wants to travel, he/she will have to apply for an H-1B visa at a U.S. consulate abroad.

Leave a Reply

Scroll To Top