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Fight for DAPA/DACA To Continue Despite SC Ruling

Immigration was at the forefront of very significant events last week. On June 23, the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union and immigration concern was a major factor. Meanwhile on the same day, here in the United States, the Supreme Court deadlocked on Pres. Barack Obama’s immigration initiatives.

The Supreme Court’s evenly-divided decision in the case of United States v. Texas means that the lower court decision against the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) and the expansion of the Deferred Action on Child Arrivals (DACA) stays.

Pres. Obama introduced DAPA and DACA expansion in November 2014 following the failure of Congress to pass a comprehensive immigration reform bill. DAPA and DACA were meant to ease the threat of deportation of more than 4 million undocumented immigrants.

After Obama announced these immigration initiatives, Texas and 25 other states filed a lawsuit in the district court claiming that the expanded DACA and DAPA violated the “take care clause” of the Constitution. They also argued that the initiatives were not in accordance with immigration laws and violated the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). The district court judge issued a preliminary injunction blocking the implementation of these policies.

On appeal by the government, the Fifth Circuit upheld the injunction. Thus, the case found its way to the Supreme Court.

DAPA would temporarily defer deportation for those who have a US citizen or LPR son or daughter as of November 20, 2014 and who have continuously resided in the US since January 1, 2010 but with no lawful immigration status. As long as they had no criminal convictions and have passed a background check, these undocumented immigrants could benefit from DAPA.

DACA, on the other hand, was first introduced by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) back in 2012. Those under 31 years old on June 15, 2012, have arrived in the US before becoming 16, have continuously resided from June 15, 2007 to the present, are either in school, have graduated or completed high school or a general education development (GED) certificate, or are honorably discharged veterans of the US Coast Guard or US Armed Forces and have not been convicted of a felony can benefit from DACA. The expanded DACA eliminated the age requirement and pushed the arrival date to January 1, 2010.

Since its implementation in 2012, DACA has resulted in the improvement of the lives and economic conditions of over 700,000 young people who were granted work permits, obtained access to public universities and scholarships, and opened a bank account, among others.

The ruling of the Supreme Court is a setback for immigrants and their families but immigrant rights advocates are vowing to continue the fight. They are urging the Department of Justice to seek a rehearing. If this is not granted, then the case will go back to the district court for a decision on the merits. If the district court decides to strike down the initiatives, the government could appeal the case all the way to the Supreme Court again.

Immigrant advocates are also continuing to lobby the US Congress to pass immigration laws that would keep families united and benefit the economy.

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