Seguritan US Immigration Articles

Petitioning Physical Therapists for Green Card

Physical therapists continue to be very much in demand in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand is projected to grow by 34% from 2014 to 2024. This demand stems from aging baby boomers who are now in their 60s and 70s.

According to a research published in the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, “the demand for PTs will outspace the supply within. Shortages are expected to increase for all 50 states through 2030. States in the Northeast are projected to have the smallest shortages, whereas states in the south and west are projected to have the largest shortages.”

This seems like good news to foreign physical therapists who may also be looking at working here in the US either for the experience or due to lack of better opportunities in their home countries. Like nurses, PTs can live and work in the US permanently.

Physical therapists may enter the US under an immigrant visa or green card. They belong to the Schedule A occupations which means they do not have to go through the lengthy process of obtaining a labor certification before an employer can file their I-140 immigrant visa petition.

The green card process starts with the filing of an I-140 petition on behalf of the foreign physical therapist with the USCIS Service Center having jurisdiction over the intended place of employment. The petition must be supported by the following documents: application for Permanent Employment Certification (Form 9089) in duplicate; prevailing wage determination; a copy of the notice sent to applicable collective bargaining unit or a copy of the posted notice of filing (notice must be posted at the place of employment between 30 and 180 days prior to the filing of the Form I-140 petition); and a copy of all in-house media used for recruitment of similar position.

Also required are permanent license in the state of intended employment or statement signed by an authorized state of intended employment stating that the beneficiary is qualified to take the state’s licensing exam; physical therapy diploma or degree; and proof of prospective employer’s ability to pay wage (for an employer with 100 or more employees, a letter from a financial officer; if employees total less than 100, a copy of annual reports, federal tax returns or financial statements).

Foreign educated physical therapists must demonstrate that their education is “substantially equivalent” to a U.S. education. Previously, a foreign PT may only need to have a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy but since 2001, the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) discontinued accrediting bachelors’ degree programs in the US and required all US programs to offer courses that would result in a master’s degree in Physical Therapy. Then recently, in 2015, it pushed the standard again. Now, all accredited physical therapy education programs in the US only offer the Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree (DPT). Before one is admitted to the DPT program, one needs to have completed a four-year bachelor’s course.

Physical therapists must also obtain a visa screen certificate either from the Foreign Credentialing Commission on Physical Therapy (FCCPT) or the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS). The certificate ensures that their credentials and English proficiency qualify them in performing their professional work in the US.

It is important to note that the FCCPT’s issuance of a visa screen certificate is a confirmation that the physical therapist’s education is equivalent to at least a master’s degree in Physical Therapy. This qualifies the applicant for the employment-based second preference (EB-2) classification

USCIS Expects H-1B Cap To Be Reached April 5

The USCIS announced last March 15 that more petitions than the H-1B cap may be filed between April 1, 2013, the start of the filing season and April 5. It is therefore recommended that employers file cap subject H-1B petitions within those first five days. A petition is considered accepted, not on the date the petition is postmarked, but on the date the USCIS receives it.

Each fiscal year, an H-1B visa quota of 65,000 is allotted for foreign workers in specialty occupations. An additional 20,000 H-1B visas are made available to graduates with advanced degrees from U.S. universities. For fiscal year 2013, the H-1B cap of 65,000 was reached on June 11, 2012.

The public will be notified of the final receipt date or the date when the quota is reached. When the number of petitions received by the USCIS exceeds the quota, the USCIS will conduct an H1-B lottery which will randomly select the petitions to be accepted for processing. Petitions not selected in the lottery will be rejected and returned. Petitions filed after the final receipt date will also be rejected. It was in 2008 when the USCIS last used the lottery system.

Processing of H-1B petitions may be expedited through premium processing request on Form I-907. This may be filed concurrently with the H-1B petition. For a fee of $1,225, premium processing guarantees a fifteen calendar day processing of filed petitions from receipt of the request. This year however the USCIS will start premium processing of H-1B petitions subject to cap on April 15, 2013. This is to address the expected high volume of premium processing requests and the likelihood that the cap will be met in the first five days of filing.

Before the filing of an H-1B petition on Form I-129, the petitioner must file with the U.S. Department of Labor, a Labor Condition Application (LCA). The certified LCA must be filed with the Form I-129 petition.

To be classified as a specialty occupation for H-1B purposes, the occupation requires at least a bachelor’s degree or higher in the specific specialty or its equivalent. In order to be eligible for a specialty occupation, the beneficiary must have at least one of the following: (1) US bachelor or higher degree, (2) foreign degree equivalent to a US bachelor degree or higher, (3) an unrestricted license or certification to practice profession or (4) experience equivalent to completion of degree.

The H-1B petition must be accompanied by proof that the beneficiary is eligible for H-1B classification. Documentary evidence includes diploma, transcript of records, credentials evaluation and license to practice the profession, if required, among others.

The USCIS allows for the submission of other evidence if the degree has not been awarded yet but requirements for the degree have been met. The final transcript as well as a letter from the Registrar confirming that all degree requirements have been met may suffice.

A U.S. employer cannot file multiple H-1B petitions for the same beneficiary. Multiple H-1B petitions by a single employer for the same beneficiary will be rejected. However, related employers such as a principal and subsidiary may file for the same worker for different positions subject to other requirements. The H-1B beneficiary may work for more than one employer provided that each employer files a separate petition with the required labor condition application.

There is a base fee of $320 for an H-1B petition, an ACWIA fee of $750 or $1,500 depending on the number of employees of the employer and an anti-fraud fee of $500.

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